Linux Today: Linux News On Internet Time.
Search Linux Today
Linux News Sections:  Developer -  High Performance -  Infrastructure -  IT Management -  Security -  Storage -
Linux Today Navigation
LT Home
Contribute
Contribute
Link to Us
Linux Jobs


More on LinuxToday


LinuxWorld: ARDI Executor; Emulate Mac OS on your Linux box

May 03, 2000, 02:52 (7 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Pawel Leszek)

"Whether you're a Mac user new to Linux or a seasoned Penguinista who needs to access Mac files, Executor can help you -- probably. We put this Mac emulator through its paces and promise to tell all."

"Executor comes from ARDI (Abacus Research and Development, Inc.), a small company that developed this product over ten years. ARDI's president and founder, Cliff Matthews, has explained many times that Executor cannot be a Mac substitute because Apple will not license its Mac OS code for use on non-Apple hardware. So if you want to develop software that can run Mac applications on a PC, you need to do it without Apple."

"The way Executor works is similar to Wine (the Windows program execution environment for Linux). Executor translates on the fly all API calls into native Linux x86 code. That's different from VMware, which isolates the emulated OS in its own virtual environment (or virtual machine). Executor works much harder than Wine, because Executor not only implements the Macintosh Toolbox API (as Wine does with the Windows API) but also translates alien binary code into native x86 instructions. Moreover, Wine is able to use installed Windows OS components like dynamic link libraries (DLLs). Executor cannot use Mac OS system software, so many problems with compatibility arise, as you will discover below. The good news is that Executor's approach simplifies installation, reduces costs (you don't need to buy the original OS), and is quite speedy."

"Executor is able to read HFS-formatted CD-ROMs and Mac SCSI disks without any problems -- although it doesn't mount them on the Linux file system. Executor can also read and write 1.4 MB Mac-formatted floppy disks. Unfortunately, if you have some old Mac 800 KB floppies, you're out of luck. You can't read them because of hardware limitations in PC floppy drives, and there is nothing you can do with that."

Complete Story

Related Stories: