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Duke of URL: Mozilla M16 [Review]

Jul 22, 2000, 13:33 (13 Talkback[s])

[ Thanks to Patrick Mullen for this link. ]

"The new Mozilla is a little chunkier than its Netscape 4.x brother, weighing in at about 16 MB of RAM. This is a pretty significant jump, especially since Netscape Communicator 4.73 only consumed about 10 MB of RAM. Still, the young browser weighs in just about where IE is, which also consumes about 16 MB, and also "upgrades" your system (if you're running Windows 95) to consume about 4 more MB, as well. Nice features, right?"

"...to really behold Mozilla's power, take it on a 56 K dial-up connection and watch it make mince-meat out of the competition. Have a little extra memory you'd like to give it? With a few quick tweaks, you can allocate more memory to Netscape (see the Memory Cache under the Preferences), and boy, does it ever make good use out of it. For regular browsing, Mozilla offers the same tweaks Netscape 4.x and 3.x offer, but the untweaked browsing speed was much faster for me. This was the case on both dial-up and network connections, but merely more noticeable on the lowly dial-up connection."

"Unfortunately, Mozilla M16 is also missing some protocols. Protocols, such as HTTPS have not been implemented yet, meaning you'll need to switch to Netscape 4.x or IE just to do your server administration. ... Another area Mozilla M16 is lacking in it plug-in support. If only it could jive with those old Netscape 4.x plug-ins, things could be so much easier! ... Currently, very few plug-ins are available..."

"Mozilla M16 looks to be the face of the future. If it can overcome its lack of plug-in support and Java, it could possibly become the next titan in the browser war. While Internet Explorer is currently winning, we've seen how quickly the tables can turn against companies that refuse to support standards-much like Microsoft is doing with version 5.5 of their famous browser."

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