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Two Interviews with Torvalds

Jul 16, 2003, 16:00 (2 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Steven Burke, Heather Clancy, Ed Scannell, Brian Fonseca)

CRN: CRN Interview: Linus Torvalds

[ Thanks to jig for this link. ]

"Linux creator Linus Torvalds defended the integrity of Linux intellectual property in an interview with CRN Editor Heather Clancy and Editor/News Steven Burke at CA the World conference. Torvalds--who recently left Transmeta to work on Linux full time at the Open Source Development Lab--talks about Read Copy Update code, copyright protection and SCO during the half-hour interview.

"CRN: How has the SCO-IBM lawsuit affected Linux?

"Torvalds: The biggest effect by far has just been a lot of time wasted on discussion. Obviously there have been a lot of people worried. But it hasn't actually affected [Linux] in any real sense. Part of the reason is that it hasn't affected it in any real sense is the way we have done development, because it has been so open, there has always been a very real electronic trail of exactly how everything came into the kernel from which source and stuff like that..."

Complete Story

InfoWorld: Interview: Torvalds Gets Down to the Kernel

"InfoWorld: How difficult a development effort was Version 2.6 compared with previous efforts? Are they getting increasingly difficult as you include more complex features?

"Torvalds: This was fairly comparable to Version 2.4. It is hard to tell, really. I actually put out the first test release on Sunday evening [July 13], and that is the last beta of the program. With 2.4, that testing took about six or seven months to complete. But I think we are actually in better shape this time; we are aiming for three months but we will see what happens. It has gotten slightly more complicated, mainly because there are now more people involved. And what I mean is that doing a release always means synchronizing. And when you have more people to synchronize it takes longer because you get more issues that come up. But on the whole it was not that different from 2.4..."

Complete Story

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