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Release Digest: GNU, January 28, 2004

Jan 29, 2004, 05:00 (0 Talkback[s])

Gnu arch 1.2pre2

A new release of GNU arch, tla-1.2pre2, is now officially available.

GNU arch is a distributed, changeset-oriented revision control system: an alternative to CVS and to proprietary tools such as those used to maintain the Linux kernel.

It can be obtained from:

The tar bundle is called tla-1.2pre2.tar.gz. Accompanying the distribution is a gpg detached signature (tla-1.2.tar.gz.sig) and my public key is attached to this message. The MD5 checksum of the tar bundle is eb6cfa562c580dd8368890c5c2f8b9c8.

This release contains bugfixes, performance enhancements, and corrected instructions for using the new "signed archive" features.

ATTENTION: users currently using the the signed archive feature should download this release and read the instructions in ./=ARCH-USERS-README. Upgrading is not strictly necessary -- although your ".check files" should be modified.

For more project information, you can visit:

There have been several contributors to this release. All are, I hope, honored in the patch logs. But deserving of particular mention are Aaron Bentley and Robert Collins.

Thank you for your support,
- - -t

and for payments.

The arch project is financially supported entirely by contributions from the general public. Financial help, if you are able to provide, is both very much needed and very much appreciated. You can find more information about this at:

Contributors should know that by helping in response to GNU arch, you will also be helping to further the new Pika Scheme project -- a project aimed at producing, among other things, an "Emacs for the modern age; a global emacs; a graphical emacs."

The arch project is also, significantly, supported by contributions of labor by a substantial number of volunteers (listed in the ChangeLog and in the =THANKS file -- both of which, I fear, are doomed to be an incomplete record). A community of contributors has helped arch to advance far more rapidly than would otherwise have been possible.