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Developer Linux News for Oct 20, 2000

  • Raphael Bauduin: Regarding GNOME and Ghostscript: An Answer to the Open Letter from Raph Levien [Updated: Raph Levien Responds] (Oct 20, 2000, 21:09)
    Last month, developer Raph Levien announced that he'd taken over maintainership of the Ghostscript project. Levien discussed his intentions for the project, including better color management, better inkjet printer support, and clearer licensing. Levien also mentioned linking Ghostscript more closely to GNOME libraries (GdkRgb in particular) to improve GUI support over that provided by gv and GSView. Here, reader Raphael Bauduin takes issue with this last proposal.

  • Wired: Remember Pong? uWink's for U (Oct 20, 2000, 20:35)
    "UWink machines are powered by a lot of generic PC parts, such as Intel processors, hard drives and network cards. They run a Linux- derivative operating system."

  • OLinux.com.br: E-speak: HP choose Open Source platform for e-service on the Internet (Oct 20, 2000, 20:04)
    "Ravi Balakrishnan, e-speak developer, talks about this espectacular e-service tool for the Internet businesses. "E-speak facilitates dynamic interactions among e-services on the open Internet."

  • Kernel Cousin Samba #29 by John Quirk And Zack Brown (Oct 20, 2000, 19:45)
    Samba is an open source software suite that provides seamless file and print services to SMB/CIFS clients.

  • Fox News: Linux with Themes: A Good-Looking Geek Magnet (Oct 20, 2000, 18:23)
    "It'd be easy to assume that Linux, the de facto computer-geek operating system, would look pretty boring. But the bright, colorful desktops might surprise you. Linux... has been built from the ground up to be entirely customizable."

  • ZDNet UK: Neutrino OS is Unix flavour of the month (Oct 20, 2000, 18:05)
    "QNX Neutrino was picked to power 3Com's Audrey Net appliance. And alliances with the likes of Palm and Cisco are widely rumoured."

  • ZDNet UK: Sun code move applauded, But will user expectations spoil its chances? (Oct 20, 2000, 17:16)
    "Mike Doyle, IT manager at charity Cooperation Ireland, where Office 97 is deployed, said managing user expectations could be a problem with an open source office suite. "If people know we have the source code they may expect us to fix a bug, but we are not staffed up to do this sort of work. Managing user expectation, which is already difficult enough, will become even more difficult. "

  • ZDNet: Get your red hot Linux apps -- from Chilliware (Oct 20, 2000, 14:40)
    "Starting Monday, Chilliware will begin shipping its first few products. Besides its own version of Linux aimed at the desktop market, the company also is fielding Nexxus, a contact manager; Mentor, a documentation wizard; IceSculptor, a desktop publisher; and Mohawk Apache, a server configuration product."

  • OODS begins weekly topic collaboration (Oct 20, 2000, 14:18)
    "The Open Object Directory Services (OODS) project aims to make full-fledged open source object-based directory services into reality. The project is a result of over a year of development time invested in the Linux Knowledge Base Project (LKB) in which pseudo directory services were attempted using PHP and MySQL."

  • InfoWorld: Bowstreet debuts toolkit for business-to-business directory (Oct 20, 2000, 08:00)
    "Bowstreet is making available for free an open-source, Java-based toolkit for the proposed Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) standard, dubbed jUDDI."

  • O'Reilly Network: OpenAL Applications: The User's View (Oct 20, 2000, 07:09)
    "OpenAL is the audio programming interface inside the games Heavy Gear II and Soldier Of Fortune, both ported to Linux by Loki...."

  • ZDNet: A kinder, humbler Microsoft? (Oct 20, 2000, 03:57)
    "If Microsoft truly is becoming humbler, it's also because the company doesn't many options left. If Microsoft doesn't make nice with its hardware, software and services colleagues, they can find lots of eager new playmates on the Linux side of the picket fence."