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Developer Linux News for Jan 25, 2002

  • Kernel Cousin GNUe #13 by Peter Sullivan (Jan 25, 2002, 21:52)
    Weekly summary of the GNU Enterprise Project, "Putting the 'Free' back in 'free enterprise'."

  • The Register: Net patent tax - W3C publishes new advice (Jan 25, 2002, 18:48)
    "The RAND addition was stalled after the issue blew up at the end of September, with open source developers advocating the formation of an alternative to the W3C, if royalty-bearing licenses became an option. Now, with the input of Bruce Perens and Eben Moglen, a compromise has been reached."

  • WIRED: Can WINE Ferment Move to Linux? (Jan 25, 2002, 17:37)
    "'More programs fail to run under WINE than successfully run,' [CodeWeavers' Jeremy] White said. But he said that WINE 1.0 will feature a lot of 'very important internal changes,' including an easier and more efficient application installer."

  • Linux Journal: Mouse Programming with libgpm (Jan 25, 2002, 10:04)
    "It is quite easy to program with gpm and write portable and robust applications with a few lines of code. In this article, I will explain the concepts involved in programming the mouse with simple but effective examples."

  • Adam Wiggins: Open Source on the Business Desktop (Jan 25, 2002, 05:29)
    "My employer, TrustCommerce, has been making a slow transition to open source desktops over the past year. Today we have removed almost all proprietary software from the company desktops, and we're doing business just as well (and arguably better) than before. Surprisingly, the majority of our customers are not members of the open source community (though a good portion of them are). In fact, most of our customers have no idea what the the terms "Open Source" or "proprietary" mean, and would think we were crazy if we took Richard Stallman's suggestion and rejected the many .doc and .xls files that are sent to us each day."