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Developer Linux News for May 08, 2009

  • Interview with Edward Hervey, maintainer of the PiTiVi video editor (May 08, 2009, 22:03)
    FootNotes: "This is the fourth in a series of interviews about open source multimedia, the previous interviews were about Jokosher, Totem and Empathy. For this interview we talk with Edward Hervey who is the maintainer of the PiTiVI video editor. Edward will talk to us about the current status of the PiTiVi video editor and their plans going forward."

  • Scripting the Vim editor with Vmscript (May 08, 2009, 21:03)
    IBM Developerworks: "In this series of articles, we'll look at the most popular modern variant of vi, the Vim editor, and at the simple yet extremely powerful scripting language that Vim provides. This first article explores the basic building blocks of Vim scripting: variables, values, expressions, simple flow control, and a few of Vim's numerous utility functions."

  • AMD Releases R600/700 Programming Guide (May 08, 2009, 20:33)
    Phoronix: "While the open-source 3D support is still emerging for the Radeon HD 2000, 3000, and 4000 series, AMD has released some more documentation. This time around they have a programming guide for those developers interested in understanding the latest ATI GPUs."

  • The A-Z of Programming Languages: Tcl (May 08, 2009, 19:33)
    Computerworld: "In this interview Tcl creator John Ousterhout, took some time to tell Computerworld about the extensibility of Tcl, its diverse eco-system and use in NASA's Mars Lander project."

  • Teeny weeny Linux SBCs (May 08, 2009, 16:03)
    LinuxDevices: "Typically, you can get all the functions of a full computer system -- including CPU, program memory, "solid-state disk", serial and parallel ports, display interface, and network interface -- in less than a dozen square inches of space. A few even manage to cram an embedded Linux computer into under three square inches!"