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Developer Linux News for Aug 18, 2010

  • Where do Debian Developers Come From? (Aug 18, 2010, 22:33)
    Linux Journal: "In a study not likely to cause controversy, Christian Perrier has published the results of his analysis of the number of Debian developers per country."

  • Critical Vulnerability Silently Patched in Linux Kernel (Aug 18, 2010, 21:47)
    Softpedia: "A highly dangerous privilege escalation vulnerability, which can allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code as root from any GUI application, has been patched in the Linux kernel."

  • Planning for a Revolution: Call to Designers (Aug 18, 2010, 17:35)
    OpenSUSE Revolution: "Working on design for the openSUSE project is indeed a hard thing to do. I am not a Novell or openSUSE employee. I do what I do with my free time, which will be drastically reduced soon, because the school year is starting at the end of the month."

  • Mozilla: Firefox 4 will be one generation ahead (Aug 18, 2010, 14:35)
    derStandard: "Over the last few years Firefox enjoyed the role of the rising star in the browser world. Nowadays Google Chrome seems to have taken that very spot, currently even grabbing some market share from Mozilla."

  • Fontasia: View and categorize your fonts (Aug 18, 2010, 07:34)
    Shallow Sky: "We were talking about fonts again on IRC, and how there really isn't any decent font viewer on Linux that lets you group fonts into categories. "

  • PyMT 0.5 advances multi-touch for Python (Aug 18, 2010, 06:04)
    The H Open: "PyMT 0.5 supports Windows 7 and Mac OS X multi-touch APIs and, in this version, now supports Linux multi-touch kernel events, which were introduced in the 2.6.32 Linux kernel."

  • Python4Kids New Tutorial: Consolidation and CryptoPyThy (Aug 18, 2010, 00:04)
    Python Tutorials for Kids: "...we've now got a good slice of the basic concepts down and are able to write a program which will make use of them. I'm calling it CryptoPyThy ('crypt-oh-pih-thee') and we can use it to make secret messages that no one else can read"