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LinuxDevices.com: Linux-based PenguinRadio to revolutionize radio?

Jan 28, 2000, 18:20 (1 Talkback[s])

[ Thanks to linuxdevices.com for this link. ]

"One day, every radio will work this way" boasts PenguinRadio cofounder Andrew Leyden. PenguinRadio LLC, a small Washington DC based startup, has giant plans to revolutionize how we listen to music and radio when we're not sitting at our computers. Powered by an embedded Linux operating system and "x86" CPU, and connected to the Internet via a modem or Ethernet, PenguinRadios will tap into the thousands of radio stations that put their streaming audio feeds on the Internet, delivering your favorite news, music, or talk shows -- right to your stereo system. No computers needed...."

"Put simply, we are building the next generation of Internet audio devices," says Leyden. "The PenguinRadio is a small Linux-based box that is designed to expand the abilities of any home stereo, extending its reach to the far corners of the globe" continues Leyden. The Internet audio appliance connects to a user's phone line (or to an Ethernet connection, if available) and receives a streaming media feed from the Internet which it outputs directly into the home stereo system. A remote control is used to select stations and provide other user inputs...."

"PenguinRadio has already established an Internet music and radio portal site capable of delivering streaming audio to web users' computers and next generation Internet audio devices (including cell phones). An easily navigated database on the PenguinRadio web site makes it easy for users to quickly locate desired stations or songs. To simplify the task of tracking favorite sound sources, PenguinRadio has created a unique (patent pending) six-digit ID system that substitutes for today's complex -- and rapidly changing -- URLs."

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