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O'Reilly Network: ActiveState IDEs for Perl and Python to Use Mozilla and Visual Studio Frameworks

May 25, 2000, 21:11 (2 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Howard Wen)

"ActiveState Tool Corp., an O'Reilly affiliate, is building two integrated development environments (IDEs) for scripting languages with full initial support for Perl and Python, the company announced [May 24, 2000]. The first IDE, called Komodo, uses the Mozilla application framework and is cross-platform. Mozilla, an open source software project, provides Internet client software that includes a browser, mail and news functionality, and a toolkit for developing Web-based applications. Mozilla's code, designed for performance and portability and featuring industry-leading standards support, has generated substantial interest in the open source community. The second IDE plugs Visual Perl and Visual Python into Microsoft's Visual Studio 7.0 framework and gives Visual Studio developers easy integration with their existing tools."

"The new ActiveState IDEs will offer features familiar to users of other IDEs. These include an editor that supports language-specific syntax coloring, language-sensitive tool tips, smart indentation control, parenthesis matching, integrated error highlighting, and context-sensitive integrated help. An interactive debugger will let programmers walk through their code, setting breakpoints and viewing the contents of variables. Many scripting language programs are still debugged by embedding debug, time print-type statements in the code. ActiveState's IDEs will save programmers this hassle."

"ActiveState is designing the IDEs so they can be easily modified and expanded upon by the programmer. The Mozilla IDE source code will be visible and will use standards such as XML, CSS, RDF, FTP, WebDAV, and HTTP. "This will make it easy for users to extend the IDE as well as learn how a complex Mozilla application is built," Hardt says. "Since we're targeting people who write scripts, we envision that many of them will create extensions to the IDE that will be shared with the community."

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