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LinuxDevices.com: My Linux is smaller than your Linux

Jun 11, 2000, 18:49 (0 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Rick Lehrbaum)

[ Thanks to LinuxDevices.com for this link. ]

"Unlike many realms of human endeavor, when it comes designing embedded systems, the goal is often to use as few resources as possible. In embedded systems, less is more, in many ways. Using less resources means less cost, less heat generation, more battery life, more reliability -- and best of all, a more successful product."

"During the past year, Linux has rocketed to prominence as one of the two or three most popular operating systems for new embedded system designs. Since "Embedded Linux" as a product is less than one year old, and given the common perception of Linux as a full-function server or desktop OS that requires hundreds of megabytes of disk space, it's no surprise that one of the most common questions about embedded Linux among developers is "How much RAM memory and disk space does an embedded system require to run Linux?"

"There are two reasons why it's difficult to answer that question with a few simple numbers. First, Linux is open source. As a result, developers possess the tools to eliminate unnecessary functionality to match the requirements of a given configuration. Secondly, embedded systems are incredibly diverse, so there are almost as many required Linux configurations as there are unique embedded systems (and that's in the tens of thousands)."

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