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Apache Today: Oracle Introduces Oracle 9i Application Server

Oct 02, 2000, 14:47 (2 Talkback[s])

"Extending its technology lead in an expected $11 billion application server market, Oracle Corp. (Nasdaq: ORCL), the largest provider of software for e-business, today announced the forthcoming availability of Oracle9i Application Server, featuring patent-pending Web cache technology that dramatically increases Web site performance and scalability. E-businesses can expect impressive capacity improvements, starting with a single instance of Oracle9i Application Server on inexpensive hardware. The Oracle(R) Store, for example, has seen more than 100-fold improvement in throughput, with a 70% decrease in back-end server load, since deploying Oracle9i Application Server."

"Oracle9i Application Server is the evolution of Oracle Internet Application Server 8i. Its advanced cache technology takes the pressure off of busy Web sites by storing and load balancing frequently accessed Web pages in memory, whether the pages are statically or dynamically generated. As a result, Oracle9i Application Server can service up to 7,500 HTTP requests per second on a single 2-CPU machine, whereas most dynamic Web sites require hundreds of Web servers to sustain this level of throughput."

"To produce sustained quality of service during peak times, Oracle9i Application Server's patent-pending surge protection technology provides consistent cache performance even during traffic spikes or if Web site content is changing frequently. Competing Web cache products do not offer the same level of performance guarantee, and force customers to rely on expensive and complex content delivery tools to propagate content updates to their caches. In addition, these content delivery tools cannot handle the volume of content updates demanded by today's leading dynamic Web sites."

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