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Pinehead.com: GIMP: GIF Animation

Mar 11, 2001, 13:19 (7 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by maddog)

[ Thanks to Maddog for this link. ]

"Making an animation with the GIMP is an easy matter. It's the same simple frame by frame concept you might have played with as a kid, drawing images on different pages of a tablet and then flipping the pages. All that's involved is making a number of layers which will act as frames, putting them together, and saving your work as an animated GIF."

"Begin by creating a new image sized 256 x 80. Add some color using the fill or gradient tool. Open the "Layers, Channels & Paths" window and make a transparent second layer sized 80 x 80 using the "New Layer" icon at the lower left. With the new layer selected as your active layer make a selection using one of the selection tools in the toolbox. Fill in the selection, again using the fill or gradient tool. Remove or save the selection in Image:Select. Now save as an XCF. You now have a rectangular image with an object at the left."

"Right click the image, choose "Layers|Flatten Image" to combine the two layers, and save as an XCF. Make sure to name it something like "frame1" so you'll be able to identify the layers and put them in the proper sequence later. Reopen your original image. Select the second layer in Layers, Channels... and nudge the object to the right. You can do this by hitting the "Move Layers and Selections" button in the toolbox and moving the layer with your right arrow key. Flatten the image and save as "frame2". Repeat this rather tedious process until your object has moved all the way to the right side of the image and you have a number of frames to work with. How many times you do this depends on how many frames you want. Keep in mind that making an animation can produce a rather large file and that size matters, especially if you plan to use your creations on the web."

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