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OpenOffice.org: OpenOffice Turns 2

Oct 15, 2002, 19:00 (3 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Louis Suárez-Potts)

[Editor's Note: This article is excerpted from one of the several posted by OpenOffice.org to mark the second aniversary of the project. In it, OpenOffice.org Editor Louis Suárez-Potts gives his message to OpenOffice.org developers and users. -BKP]

"This year has been extraordinary for OpenOffice.org, and any report of what has happened could not do justice to all who have made it happen nor to all that has happened. So, first off, allow me to state that the most remarkable thing about the last year has been—and will continue to be—the growth and maturation of the OpenOffice.org community.

"I include the developers and endusers and everyone who has either coded or submitted patches, suggestions, advice, bugfixes, constructive complaints (lots of those!), praise (lots of that, too), time, effort, money, sleep.

"Congratulations, all! This project has far exceeded its promise. OpenOffice.org is used now by millions of people throughout the world, as well as in corporations and governments, both large and small, thanks to you.

"Why do they use it? Because it answers the question of not, 'Where do you want to go today?' but, 'What do you want to do today?' The first is silly and assumes you have lots of cash, the second real and makes no assumptions. It in fact gives you the capital to do what you need to do.

"People use OpenOffice.org because it, and the project, work for them. They may be using Linux, Solaris, Windows, FreeBSD, LinuxPPC, IRIX, Linux S/390, TRU64, Mac OS X (via X11): virtually any flavor of Windows or Unix. OpenOffice.org will write, draw, calculate, present in at least 23 languages, and do it using internationally standardized technology that is more robust than, well, you-know-what, whose documents it reads--and will even fix..."

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