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NewsForge: Former Caldera CEO Ransom Love Joins Progeny Board

Nov 11, 2003, 13:00 (7 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Robin Miller)

"A press release is out this morning... that says Ransom Love is joining Progeny's board of directors. Progeny founder--now Board Chairman and Chief Strategist--Ian Murdock says they went after Ransom, not the other way around. 'We asked him,' Ian adds with a small laugh, 'but he was more than willing.' And why wouldn't he be? Progeny is not only profitable today but has been profitable for the last two years and is reinvesting its profits in the company. It is now up to 25 employees and is looking at further growth in the future...

"Reasons to use Progeny's services (or Linux From Scratch, if you have more time than money) instead of a one-size-fits-all Linux distribution include greater security--you have only the exact packages you need installed, set with the 'right' defaults from the start--and greater speed with less memory footprint--again because you only have what you need installed, not what somebody at a distribution packager thinks you might need or should have.

"This is why Ransom Love is the perfect Progeny board member. Aside from being, as Ian puts it, 'One of the pioneers in building businesses around Linux, with a lot to offer us in terms of that experience,' Ian also says, 'If you've been following what we've been doing at Progeny, we're interested in furthering standards between distributions; in breaking down the walls that separate different distributions.' And, Ian reminds us, Ransom Love was certainly one of the first high-profile people to call for more Linux standardization, a call that often went unheeded back in the 20th century but is being listened to now. This is important for Progeny because the less hassle it takes to put different Linux components together into a seamless whole, the easier it is for Progeny to make custom Linux-based software stacks..."

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