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Video Editing Made Easy with Kino!

Mar 12, 2009, 12:01 (0 Talkback[s])

"Kino was born to tell stories
Creating even a short movie can become very complex very quickly, so it's important to keep in mind what you are doing and how it all fits into the bigger picture of making your movie. Kino is a primarily a simple storyboard non-linear video editing program with some compositing capabilities, as opposed to tape-to-tape linear editing or more complex non-linear compositing software such as Cinelerra, The Open Movie Editor, or KDEnlive.

"Before computers, movies were edited by actually cutting film tape. That process was called linear tape-to-tape editing. It required careful planning, because editing was destructive, since actual segments of tape were cut. It was "linear" because the inserted tape segments were literally attached to preceding and following segments to form a continuous whole.

"Computers allow us to do non-destructive, non-linear editing. We can easily incorporate all kinds of music, still pictures, and video into a single movie. We can also separate out the video from the audio, and substitute still images or other video segments while the audio from the first track continues to roll over those newly added elements. Those new elements are called "assets" and the process of adding new elements is called "compositing."

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