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A look at LinuxConsole 1.0.2009

Dec 18, 2009, 07:34 (0 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Jesse Smith)

"The current release comes in three flavours: Multimedia, which is a small live CD designed to enable you to get on the web, listen to music and play videos; the full CD edition, which comes with a complete GNOME desktop; and the DVD edition, which includes all the packages from the CD with some extras thrown in. There is also a tool, called Jukebox, which allows the user to build their own custom install image. This is similar to Slax's ISO builder and allows for a great deal of flexibility. For my test drive, I downloaded the Multimedia image.

"First impressions

"While downloading, I took a quick look at the project's web site. It has a clean, simple layout which appeals to me. The site is easy to navigate and comes with some basic documentation, help forums, a news section and, of course, a download page. One thing which makes LinuxConsole stand out right away on the site is a mixture of English and French. The login form asks, "Forgot your password?" right next to the news announcement stating, that the Multimedia edition is "Pour les ordinateurs anciens, ou les système avec peu d'espace disque". While I speak passable conversational French, that skill doesn't extend far into technical terms and it made me shy away from trying my luck with the Jukebox build-your-own feature. I'd like to add that during the course of the week I was using LinuxConsole, more and more of the text on the site changed to English and translation is an on-going process.

"To test this distribution, I put the Multimedia CD in my desktop machine, which has a 2.5 GHz CPU, 2 GB of RAM and a NVIDIA graphics card. My test drive also included my LG laptop, which has a 1.5 GHz CPU, 2 GB of RAM and an ATI graphics card. To see how the distro works on lower-end hardware, I also ran it in a virtual machine. Once the LinuxConsole image was downloaded and burned to CD things progressed very smoothly. The CD provides the option to select your preferred language and has a live desktop up and running in seconds. The desktop is easy to look at and comes with a few icons for navigating folders and launching Firefox (version 3.5). The windows are themed to look like Mac OS X, but this can be changed to any of the fifteen different styles."

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