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Who Really Contributed the High-End Tech to Project Monterey?

Jun 01, 2010, 14:31 (0 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Pamela Jones)

"Here's something interesting, a Santa Cruz 8K from October 26, 1998, which consists mostly of two press releases announcing the IBM-SCO joint partnership to do Project Monterey.

"Guess who would be providing the bulk of the high-end enterprise capabilities and contributing them to UnixWare? Hint: Not SCO.

"The idea of the project was a single Unix for the enterprise that Intel, IBM, SCO, Sequent, etc. would all unitedly push, for Intel's IA-64 platform and UnixWare would be beefed up for IA-32, and thus the end result would be one UNIX everyone could market for IA-32, IA-64 and Power platforms, after pooling resources. But it was IBM and Sequent, now part of IBM, who would do the heavy lifting with regard to the high-end beefing up.

"Sequent, the press release says, would be contributing "its cc:NUMA technology and Intel architecture expertise." Here's what IBM would contribute:

"As part of this initiative, a UNIX operating system will be developed for Intel's IA-64 using IBM's AIX operating system's enterprise capabilities complemented with technology from SCO's UnixWare and Sequent's PTX operating system. IBM will also transfer AIX technology to SCO's UnixWare and promote the offering in the UNIX on IA-32 market. The result will be a single UNIX operating system product line that runs on IA-32, IA-64 and IBM microprocessor"

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