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Infrastructure Linux News for Sep 14, 2001

  • LinuxWorld.com: How IRC Delivered The News (Sep 14, 2001, 20:55)
    "One part of the Internet that delivered is IRC, Internet Relay Chat. Special channels ("chat rooms" AOL-speak) dealing with the tragedy appeared minutes after they occurred. One such channel, #worldtradecenter, was set up on the Open Projects Network. The OPN is home to many open source projects, vendors, help channels, user groups, and in fact to #slashdot itself."

  • UPDATED: Editor's Note and Rescue Effort/Relief Links (Sep 14, 2001, 15:14)
    InternetNews.com staff have started a page with some informational links regarding rescue efforts directed toward the aftermath of the attacks in Washington and New York. These aren't being presented as the final word, but rather as an anchor upon which the Linux Today reading community can build, so please limit comments under this item to contributing useful links providing additional information on how best to help out in the wake of yesterday's attacks.

  • NewsForge: Lutris backs off support of Open Source Enhydra, citing problems with Sun license (Sep 14, 2001, 14:05)
    "Application server maker Lutris Technologies has pulled its support from the Open Source Enterprise Enhydra project because the company and Sun Microsystems haven't been able to agree on an Open Source version of Sun's Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition. However, a Sun spokesman says his company has no plans to give up controls on the compatibility between J2EE-based programs."

  • WIRED: Congress Mulls Stiff Crypto Laws (Sep 14, 2001, 11:57)
    "...Some politicians and defense hawks are warning that extremists such as Osama bin Laden, who U.S. officials say is a crypto-aficionado and the top suspect in Tuesday's attacks, enjoy unfettered access to privacy-protecting software and hardware that render their communications unintelligible to eavesdroppers."