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Linux News for Dec 25, 2008

  • Starting, Stopping, and Connecting to OpenOffice with Python (Dec 25, 2008, 20:04)
    Linux Journal: "Using pyuno you can script OpenOffice with Python. Pyuno allows you to create macros inside OpenOffice and it also allows you to create external Python scripts that talk to a running copy of OpenOffice."

  • OS Shoot-out: Windows vs. Mac OS X vs. Linux (Dec 25, 2008, 16:04)
    InfoWorld: "2008 saw Windows' market share drop to less than 90 percent. Should you switch to Mac or Linux, too?"
    Link fixed--ed.

  • Displaying Maps With OpenLayers (Dec 25, 2008, 12:04)
    Linux.com: "Google Maps gives you a quick and easy way to add maps to your Web site, but when you're using Google's API, your ability to display other data is limited. If you have your own data you want to display, or data from sources other than Google, OpenLayers, an open source JavaScript library, can give you more options."

  • What Is Your Gift to the Linux Community? (Dec 25, 2008, 08:04)
    Linux Loop: "In case you forgot to put the Linux community on your list or in case you just couldn't find anything for them, you're in luck. There’s a last minute gift opportunity:"

  • Building an Arduino-Based Laser Game (Dec 25, 2008, 04:04)
    IBM Developerworks: "Arduino is an inexpensive, easy-to-use electronics platform. The entire platform, both the hardware and the software, is completely open source, and the language is loosely based on C/C++. Arduino was built for makers, tinkerers, and artists who want to take the plunge into creating interactive physical objects."

  • Anatomy of Linux Process Management (Dec 25, 2008, 00:04)
    IBM Developerworks: "The creation and management of user-space processes in Linux have many principles in common with UNIX but also include several unique optimizations specific to Linux. Here, review the life cycle of Linux processes and explore the kernel internals for user process creation, memory management, scheduling, and death."