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Linux News for Aug 30, 2009

  • Tuxera Closes ExFAT Patent Agreement with Microsoft (Aug 30, 2009, 20:01)
    Linux Magazine: "Tuxera, the Finnish company behind the NTFS-3G open source driver, on its own initiative entered into an agreement with Microsoft over exFAT drivers."

  • Four More Cool Word Processors (Aug 30, 2009, 16:01)
    Linux.com: "If you've seen one online word processor--or even a handful of them--you haven't seen them all, not by a longshot. In addition to Google Docs, Zoho Writer, and emerging competitors such as EtherPad, other online offerings you might want to try include AjaxWrite, Writeboard, picoWrite and MonkeyTeX, to name a few."

  • How To Configure SquirrelMail To Allow Users To Change Their Email Passwords On (Aug 30, 2009, 12:01)
    Howtoforge: "This guide explains how you can configure your SquirrelMail webmail application on an ISPConfig 3 server so that email users can change their passwords themselves directly in SquirrelMail."

  • Four Things Open Source Projects Should Know About Dealing with the Press (Aug 30, 2009, 08:01)
    Great Wide Open: "The first step for any open source project that wants to be discovered is to make yourself discoverable."

  • Managing User Names And Passwords (Aug 30, 2009, 04:01)
    Ian's thoughts: "Revelation is a password manager for the GNOME 2 desktop. It stores accounts and passwords in a single, secure place, and gives access to them through a user-friendly graphical interface."

  • Enterprise Technologies Will Change the Consumer PC Market (Aug 30, 2009, 00:01)
    EnterpriseStorageForum: "The average consumer might not know much — if anything — about high-end technologies like pNFS, PCIe and 10Gb Ethernet (10GbE), but they could revolutionize the consumer PC market in ways that most consumers can't even begin to imagine."