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Security Linux News for Jul 24, 2000

  • Security Portal: Linux Distribution Security Report (Jul 24, 2000, 23:03)
    "We will look at response time and total number of bugs, as well as how often a distribution is released and how popular it is. A second primary concern is what software a vendor ships, and how it is configured."

  • BW: NetLOCK Partners With Digital Factory to Provide Integrated Security Solution for Linux Users (Jul 24, 2000, 20:30)
    "This agreement will enable Linux users to implement solutions with high levels of security and reliability in a wide variety of fields, including ASP, e-business, and SOHO."

  • Security Portal: Weekly Linux Security Digest 2000/07/17 to 2000/07/23 (Jul 24, 2000, 19:22)
    "Quite a few patches issued this week. On several distributions, rpc.statd (embodied as nfs-utils usually) was found to have some holes (remote root access), and also in usermod, a package that lets non-root users reboot or halt the system (you'd think they would have taken special care with this one - apparently not)."

  • CNET News.com: Sendmail to name Amdahl veteran as new CEO (Jul 24, 2000, 11:27)
    "Just because a company is based on a new philosophy doesn't mean it can't rely on traditional methods--such as hiring an old-line chief executive to bring some weight to the operation."

  • LinuxSecurity.com: Linux Security Week, July 24, 2000 (Jul 24, 2000, 11:00)
    "This week, advisories for the nfs-utils vulnerability were released. Although there are currently no known exploits for this bug, in theory, it can be used for gaining root access remotely. Advisories for nkitb, LISTSERV, wu-ftpd, gpm, and dhcp were also released."

  • Canada Computes: Linux users still vulnerable to snoops (Jul 24, 2000, 02:08)
    "In Linux, there is no system registry, so there is no easy way for companies to track much information about you. The prospect of software in Linux sending information without my knowledge, while possible, hardly seemed worth worrying about. That is, until recently."