Linux Today: Linux News On Internet Time.
Search Linux Today
Linux News Sections:  Developer -  High Performance -  Infrastructure -  IT Management -  Security -  Storage -
Linux Today Navigation
LT Home
Contribute
Contribute
Link to Us
Linux Jobs



Top White Papers




More on LinuxToday

Security Linux News for Feb 08, 2002

  • Debian Security Advisory: uucp (Feb 08, 2002, 18:38)
    "Zenith Parsec discovered a security hole in Taylor UUCP 1.06.1. It permits a local user to copy any file to anywhere which is writable by the uucp uid, which effectively means that a local user can completely subvert the UUCP subsystem, including stealing mail, etc."

  • LinuxFocus.org: Chrooting All Services in Linux (Feb 08, 2002, 14:57)
    "What is chroot? Chroot basically redefines the universe for a program. More accurately, it redefines the "ROOT" directory or "/" for a program or login session. Basically, everything outside of the directory you use chroot on doesn't exist as far a program or shell is concerned. Why is this useful? If someone breaks into your computer, they won't be able to see all the files on your system."

  • SysAdmin: Halted Firewalls (Running Linux Firewalls at Run Level 0) (Feb 08, 2002, 14:03)
    "This feature allow[s] you to run shutdown -h (halt) on the machine, and the firewall would remain active but with no drives mounted and no processes running. That is, the firewall would be in run level 0, but still be filtering packets."

  • O'Reilly Network: Scanning for Rootkits (Feb 08, 2002, 12:51)
    "The only way you can be 100 percent sure your system is clean after a rootkit infection is if you format your drive and reinstall the operating system again from the original media. However, real-life conditions can force you to keep an infected system running at least for a little while. In such a case you should at least clean up your server and get rid of the rootkits and trojans."

  • LinuxSecurity.com: Configuring Postfix (Feb 08, 2002, 12:01)
    "This document outlines running Postfix on EnGarde. Wietse Venema, author of Postfix and several other staple Internet security products, describes Postfix as an 'attempt to provide an alternative to the widely-used Sendmail program. Postfix attempts to be fast, easy to administer, and hopefully secure, while at the same time being sendmail compatible enough to not upset your users.'"