dcsimg
Linux Today: Linux News On Internet Time.





More on LinuxToday


Business 2.0: Open source policy

Dec 03, 2000, 15:41 (2 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Sean Donahue)

WEBINAR:
On-Demand

How to Help Your Business Become an AI Early Adopter


"Many programmers are holding out for the day when e-businesses can run using only open source products. A new standard may end the waiting."

"There has been much excitement recently about the open source movement, with many media outlets treating it as a new phenomenon. The Internet itself, however, is built on open source software. From TCP/IP to the Perl scripting language and the popular email server Sendmail, most of the Net's core technologies are public domain, open source products. Citing this, some programmers and software developers now argue that Internet business technologies will follow the same evolutionary path."

"So, how long will it be before a Net business is run on only open source software?..."

"Most key enterprise-class components such as database software and transaction processing tools remain proprietary products. Even with the January release of Borland/ Inprise's InterBase database to the open source community, there has not been an open source kernel available for long enough-nor a developers' community large enough, such as the one Linux enjoys-to create a full-featured product to handle online business needs. Still, the March release of the Enhydra application server brings businesses one step closer. Enhydra is an open source version of the crucial software component that manages the transactions between a company's back end and its Web site."

"Later this year, Lutris Technologies will offer an enterprise version designed to handle the complex functions and high traffic requirements of large e-businesses. The Enhydra release offers companies an open source alternative for a key strategic piece of their Web operations."

Complete Story

Related Stories:


×
We have made updates to our Privacy Policy to reflect the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation.