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NetSlaves.com: What Linux Must Do To Survive

Mar 07, 2001, 22:42 (52 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Emily K. Dresner-Thornber)

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"It would be nice if Linux survived, if only so a company developing on it would come along and hire me. However, I know Linux, I know Windows, and I know there is a huge, swinging gap between the two. While no amount of Microsoft marketing can kill an operating system that is, essentially, free, it can stop this thing from being the juggernaut so many people wish to will into existence."

"Microsoft knows what I know: Linux is not a threat. It's an annoyance. It's a thorn. It is not, really, a threat. Not now. With enough marketing and cool, new developer toys, Microsoft can sway companies just like they did before with ASP, COM, InterDev and every other new initiative they have started in the last five years. NET will invariably be a success. Bob enough pretty, shiny toys before the corporations and soon the companies will forget all about the hobby operating system that is such a hassle, just like they forgot all about CORBA and Novell. The old die-hards will stay with their precious BSD kernel but the jobs, the experience, the training, and the toys won't be there. The big push will eventually evaporate in the name of futility and the two-second attention span of the computer industry."

"Right now, Linux is the flavor of the week. It is a hot and hip topic. It is cool. Servers sprout like weeds in spring. Yet, for Linux to survive, and to survive well, it must become competitive in a very real, very business sense. It must appeal to the corporations. Companies can no longer peddle half-assed technical support and a sneer to go to the newsgroups. Patches cannot be distributed willy-nilly on the net. Linux must become a business product."

"It is time for people to rise above their hacker communities and approach it with the singular, pure aim of making money. No more revolutions. No more conquest of Rome."

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