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osOpinion: .NET? Are we insane?

Jul 04, 2000, 02:25 (11 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Manuel Amador Briz)

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"Today, I was reading my favorite sites... and I found a disturbing news post on Slashdot, called Pervasive Computing: Microsoft, MIT and the future. Why did I find it disturbing? Well, you see, there was a link to an article that left me with a bad taste about the future of computing. And it seems aimed right between the Windows users' eyebrows, promised as the panacea, the cure for all evil, the solution for all computing problems. Well, this is the kind of article that dispels this myth before it becomes true. Here, you won't find an analysis of .NET's advantages. I'd rather be openly biased than to deceive my readers."

"Well, to make a long story short, this is how the strategy develops: Our information is supposed to reside everywhere and anywhere, on service provider networks. We are supposed to rent what we had for free yesterday or for a one-time fee. I thought we users were going to have more control, more power than before. More control over their information. More power over what they could do. Turns out this "pervasive computing" phenomenon is exactly the opposite of what I wanted. Now, our information won't reside under our control. It's empowerment favoring corporations, not consumers/users."

"If you'd seen what I had recently, you wouldn't be that quiet. Go find a program called hunt. Load Google, search for hunt, download it, compile it and install on a linux computer that acts as a router. Voilà, network connection capture and seize. Trust me, after seeing that, I won't ever telnet again. How can I be compelled to send my personal information in XML form around the network? And what makes you think they won't be interested in the contents of the files stored on their computers? I, for one, am not going to trust my collection of 4000 songs and tons of personal documents to anybody else besides myself."

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