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LinuxMedNews: Interview with Andrew Ho of the Open Infrastructure for Outcomes (OIO)

Feb 02, 2001, 18:47 (0 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Saint)

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"Andrew Ho, MD has the unlikely combination of being an assistant clinical professor in the department of Psychiatry, Harbor-UCLA MedicalCenter and the leader of one of the many open source medical projects currently in existence. The Open Infrastructure for Outcomes (OIO) project is his brain child. Ho's comments and guidance on topics as diverse as meta-data, forms libraries and project convergence can be frequently found on many of open source medical computing's discussion lists. LinuxMedNews caught up with Dr. Ho to learn more about him and his views on medical open source, the OIO, his competition, HIPAA and what he does for fun."

"LMN: When did OIO start and what prompted you to begin the OIO?

Ho: As an undergraduate I began looking at improving the practice of medicine through improved tools mostly from artificial intelligence. It has been a long term interest as to how these tools can be applied. ... Between 1996 and 1997, I was studying treatment outcomes at the VA in West LA and it took a year to organize and analyze the data. I realized that data management was a big task and there were no tools for it. That's when I started planning the OIO. Nobody was or is writing software for this type of application..."

"LMN: What is OIO's target audience?

Ho: Clinical settings that want to have an outcome management tool that they could potentially use as an EMR. Alternatively, a paper-based practice could also collect data in order to analyze outcomes. For the research setting, it can be used as a research datamanagement system, for managing study work flow and running clinical trials. Research applications are basically wide open since the OIO can host arbitrary data collection forms."

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