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searchEnterpriseLinux.com: MCL's Kohari: Linux a threat to all enterprise operating systems

Feb 14, 2001, 08:00 (2 Talkback[s])
(Other stories by Jan Stafford)

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"Anyone who still doubts Linux's credibility as an important platform for enterprises is stuck in the last century, says Moiz Kohari, president and chief executive officer of Mission Critical Linux Inc., Lowell, Mass. Even the CEO of Linux nemesis Microsoft Corp. admits that Linux is a competitive threat to its Windows operating systems. Other enterprise operating systems are feeling Linux's heat, too. "Linux is a threat to any enterprise OS out there," Kohari says. In its choice of name alone, Mission Critical Linux proclaims Linux for the enterprise is a given. And those who complain about the lack in enterprise-strength applications or support for Linux are dating themselves. That is old news, too, says Kohari. He is in a position to know, as his company's Convolo Clusters and managed services technologies have helped knock down some of the barriers that once blocked Linux's entry into the enterprise. He touts Linux's strengths as an enterprise OS, while warning the Linux community to keep its guard up with Microsoft Corp., in this question and answer interview."

"Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said Linux is a threat to Windows. Do you agree?"

"Kohari:
Linux is a threat to any enterprise OS out there. Linux is a disruptive technology. The open source concept is disruptive. Any existing technology can never invest enough in disruptive technologies, because disruptive technologies come from grass roots movements that take over. This has happened in semiconductors, disk subsystems, and elsewhere. Up until now, people have been doing software development in a proprietary fashion. The open source movement is a new way of developing software, where the software gets tested and reviewed by more people. That makes the code more robust."

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