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May 2009 Archives

I don't believe that the desktop Linux market share is barely 1%. I think it is a lot higher. I have no good data to share; I base my assessment on experience and knowing the industry. There is something else that is even more persuasive, and that is how Microsoft behaves. If Linux is so insignificant, why do they pay so much attention to it? Like this new ASUS/Windows Eee PC "It's Better With Windows" ad campaign:

It's Better With Windows

"Windows helps you quickly and easily get online and connect to your devices and services-- without dealing with an unfamiliar environment or major compatibility issues."


As always, one of the best features of Linux Today is the excellent reader comments. Here is a sampling of some recent gems; I can't share all the comments that I think are good, so be sure to cruise them your own selves when you have time:

Padma - Subject: Re: How old ... ( May 20, 2009, 19:00:46 )

"I remember working on a mainframe a couple of decades ago (non-UNIX). I worked in a systems shop, and we had the same problem, even then. We ran a utility that checked the access time of all files, and sent a copy of the report (broken down by section) to each section, asking them to archive files unused for over 90 days.

"Of course, one section's response was to write another script, which 'touched' every file they owned, once every month, so we could never again tell them that they were storing data that wasn't being used!"


The anti-Linux FUD has been flying thick and fast lately. It's not even interesting fresh FUD, but tired, worn-out old FUD. If you believe the headlines and all the masses of verbiage being emitted by Redmond's tame "tech" "reporter" battalions Linux desktop market share has dropped since 2001; that not having Photoshop, AutoCad, and other specialty, expensive high-end applications are deal-breakers even for people who never use them; and that users are getting stupider and more fearful, and therefore must be protected from frightening things like command-lines, skills, and knowledge.

Now you know it's hogwash, and I know it's hogwash, and the silly people emitting all this nonsense have never even touched a Linux computer, except to poke it with a stick. Rather than wasting time countering this tired, moldy old baloney let's move on to my Common-Sense Easy-Peasy Guide to Adopting Linux.


I ran into an odd gedit bug on various versions of Ubuntu and Kubuntu; it won't save to an SSHFS mount and says it's a permissions error. But the error message is in error, because it isn't a permisssions error. But before we get to that, here is a quick SSHFS howto. I use SSHFS all the time because it is a great fast way to securely mount a remote directory locally.


SystemRescueCD just issued a shiny new release all full of great modern features and abilities. This Gentoo-based rescue Linux is a must-have in any computer user's fixit toolkit.


What is winning? It's not "world domination". Winning is changing the rules of the game so that a dirty convicted monopolist does not control the industry, and Linux/FOSS can thrive without constantly having to fight just for the right to exist.

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A PC desktop market share analysis of questionable reliability is being eagerly swallowed by Redmond's tame battalions of "tech journalists." Folks, if you're getting paid to be gasbags who are not required to publish anything of substance you're doing fine. If you're being paid to be real journalists, you're not succeeding. It's like you all have Alzheimer's and have forgotten the previous stories that you dutifully parroted stating completely different figures, like "Linux desktop market share to reach 6% in 2007."


It's bad enough having to deal with torrents of mis-spelled Viagra and weight-loss spam. It's bad enough digging out from under torrents of Windows email malware. It's bad enough getting bombarded with phishes. Now I'm seeing an increase in yet another type of spam: desperate businesses getting suckered into dumb spam schemes.